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QMCECS Seminar: Sara Pennell, 16 Match 2016

March 10, 2016

All welcome!

 

Wednesday 16 March 2016

Sara Pennell (University of Greenwich)

Nothing of Importance ever happened in a Kitchen

 

Kitchens are often the Cinderella space in historic accounts of the domestic interior, architectural change and household organisation, although by 1800, most dwellings in England had a room which we would now recognise as a kitchen. Why have we been so neglectful of the room that magazines now laud as the ‘heart of the home’? In this paper, via imaginary kitchens, the ethics of fuel economy, the Georgian ‘bake-off’ renaissance, and belief-scapes centred on the cooking hearth, Sara Pennell explores the ways in which changing technologies, social relations and moralities in the kitchen were integral to constituting the very idea of ‘home’ by the early nineteenth century.

Dr Sara Pennell is a Senior Lecturer in Early Modern British History in the Department of History, Politics and Social Sciences at the University of Greenwich. She is the author of The Making of the English Kitchen, 1600-1850, published by Bloomsbury Academic in 2016, and the co-editor of Reading and Writing Recipe Books, 1500-1800 (2013) and Didactic Literature in England, 1500-1800: Expertise Constructed (2003).

 

Chair: Amanda Vickery

 

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, cross Burdett Road, go under the Mile End Green Bridge (a large yellow bridge), over the canal, and the college is on the left. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

QMCECS Seminar 2 March 2016: Hannah Barker (Manchester)

February 24, 2016

All welcome

 

Wednesday 2 March 2016

Hannah Barker (University of Manchester)

‘Tradesmen in Love’

Hannah Barker is Professor of British History at the University of Manchester. Her research focuses on the era of the industrial revolution in Britain and on the north of England in particular. Her recent research has concentrated on issues of gender and work in towns. She has published on the impact of industrialisation on women’s employment, and specifically the degree to which the advent of modern capitalism marginalised women workers. Her current research project examines the concept of ‘family strategy’ in terms of small family businesses.

Chair: Amanda Vickery

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, cross Burdett Road, go under the Mile End Green Bridge (a large yellow bridge), over the canal, and the college is on the left. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

QMCECS Seminar: Semester 2 reminder

February 23, 2016

Please forward this invitation to any interested people. The seminar is open to all. Email us if you would like to be added to the mailing list.

 

Semester Two 2015-16

3 February: Matthew McCormack (University of Northampton): ‘Tall histories: height and Georgian masculinities’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

2 March: Hannah Barker (University of Manchester): ‘Tradesmen in Love’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

16 March: Sara Pennell (Roehampton University): ‘Nothing of importance ever happened in a kitchen’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk), Prof John Barrell, English (j.barrell@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: 3 Feb 2016: Matthew McCormack

January 20, 2016

Queen Mary Eighteenth-Century Studies Seminar 2015-2016

3 February 2016

Matthew McCormack
(University of Northampton):

Tall histories: height and Georgian masculinities

Chair: Amanda Vickery

Matthew McCormack is a Senior Lecturer in the History Department at the University of Northampton. His research focuses upon the wider relationship of masculinity to the ‘public’ world in modern Britain, and on the cultural history of war. His most recent book, on the cultural history of the militia in Georgian England was published in 2015 by OUP (Embodying the Militia in Georgian England). His first book, The Independent Man (2005) explored the ways in which political and personal freedom were conceived of in terms of ‘manly independence’, particularly in relation to the vote.

 

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Please forward this invitation to any interested people. The seminar is open to all.

 

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, cross Burdett Road, go under the Mile End Green Bridge (a large yellow bridge), over the canal, and the college is on the left. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

QMCECS/BSECS Early-Career Visiting Fellowship 2015-16

December 10, 2015

The Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, in conjunction wit the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, is pleased to accept applications for its annual Visiting Fellowship for early career researchers.

 The award consists of two parts: from BSECS £400 towards travel and living expenses, and from QMCECS seven nights accommodation in Queen Mary fellows’ housing on campus at Mile End (equivalent to £350). It will normally involve the Fellow in research in libraries and archives in London, and also in making contacts with QM researchers. Your application should make clear the nature of the research you will undertake in London on the award, and its relation to your wider research project or dissertation.

The Fellowship is open to scholars of the ‘long’ eighteenth century (or any part of it) in any discipline. This award is open to early career researchers: any doctoral student at a British university in their second year of study and above, and any post-doctoral researcher normally resident in Britain, within five years of the award of their PhD.

The application form can be downloaded from a link on this page:  http://www.qmul.ac.uk/eighteenthcentury/.

Please send completed applications, with a 2 page CV including a summary statement of your dissertation or research project, by email to Professor Markman Ellis, Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS: m.ellis [at] qmul.ac.uk.  The applications will be assessed by the centre’s governing committee.

Deadline for applications: 17 January 2016. The award must be taken up in the period February 1 to June 31 (subject to availability of accommodation).

QMCECS Seminar: Colin Jones (9 December 2015)

December 3, 2015

Wednesday 9 December 2015

Colin Jones
(Queen Mary University of London)

Maximilien Robespierre and a Life in a Day of the French Revolution

Colin Jones (CBE) is Professor of History at QMUL. He is a social and cultural historian of France whose interests focus around the eighteenth century. He has published widely and is the author or editor of around 20 books of eighteenth century France and the French Revolution, the history of medicine, and physiognomy and caricature. His most recent monograph is The Smile Revolution in 18th Century Paris (2014). He is currently working on a project that focuses on the day of 9 Thermidor when Robespierre was overthrown.

Chair: Miles Ogborn

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk), Prof John Barrell, English (j.barrell@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, cross Burdett Road, go under the Mile End Green Bridge (a large yellow bridge), over the canal, and the college is on the left. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

QMCECS Seminar: John Barrell, 25 Nov 2015

November 17, 2015

25 November 2015

Professor John Barrell

Queen Mary University of London

‘The Meeting of the Waters’

Thomas Moore’s ‘The Meeting of the Waters’ was one of the most popular and most often performed songs in the late Victorian and Edwardian periods, in Britain as well as in Ireland, in the USA, in Australia and elsewhere in the Empire. It became an anthem of the temperance movement, of the Irish Land League, and of canal-builders in America. This paper however is as much about the history of its title-phrase as of the song itself. By 1914, the song’s popularity made the phrase one of the commonest place-names in the empire. Hundreds of places were known as the ‘meeting of the waters’. Nowadays, however, though it survives as the name of an online dating-site, as a place-name the phrase has all but disappeared, and with it the memory that this or that place was ever known as ‘the meeting of the waters’.

John Barrell is Professor of English Literature in the Department of English at Queen Mary University of London. He has published widely on the literature, history and art of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in Britain, focusing on language, landscape, law, empire, theories of society and progress, and the theory of painting. His most recent book, Edward Pugh of Ruthin, was published by the University of Wales Press in 2013. He is slowly writing a book on the artists of the Royal Academy and the politics of reform in the 1790s, and has recently begun a new project on Thomas Moore and the Irish diaspora. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the English Association, an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters of the University of Chicago, an honorary D. Litt, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, and in 2014 became an Honorary Fellow of King’s College Cambridge.

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS

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