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QMCECS/BSECS Short-Term Early-Career Visiting Fellowship 2018-19

December 19, 2018

The Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, in conjunction wit the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, is pleased to accept applications for its annual Visiting Fellowship for early career researchers.

The award consists of two parts: from BSECS £400 towards travel and living expenses, and from QMCECS seven nights accommodation in Queen Mary fellows’ housing on campus at Mile End (equivalent to £400). It will normally involve the Fellow in research in libraries and archives in London, and also in making contacts with QM researchers. Your application should make clear the nature of the research you will undertake in London on the award, and its relation to your wider research project or dissertation.

The Fellowship is open to scholars of the ‘long’ eighteenth century (or any part of it) in any discipline. This award is open to early career researchers: any doctoral student at a British university in their second year of study and above, and any post-doctoral researcher normally resident in Britain, within five years of the award of their PhD.

Deadline for applications: 17 January in any year. The award must be taken up in the period February 1 to June 31 (subject to availability of accommodation).

The application form can be downloaded here as a word document.

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QMCECS Seminar: Anne Thell (NUS): Tuesday 4 December 2018

December 3, 2018

Tuesday 4 December 2018

Anne Thell (National University of Singapore)

Resisting the Sovereignty of Sight in Samuel Johnson’s Journey to the Western Islands (1775)

Across his career, Samuel Johnson had a great deal to say about travel and travel writing, as he believed that these activities might enable the production of universal knowledge and a more comprehensive moral philosophy. However, in his own travelogue, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland (1775), Johnson emphasizes not a smooth process of knowledge accrual but rather the problems and uncertainties of observation, perception, and induction. Indeed, Johnson’s Journey is formally provocative in ways not yet adequately explored in that it focuses on visual deprivation in order to explore the role of the senses in relation to the mind and, more broadly, to undermine empiricist assumptions about the primacy of sight. All of this helps to concretize the Journey’s unexpected moral lesson: ‘Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses … advances us in the dignity of thinking beings’.

Chair: Markman Ellis

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: Plan 2018-19

November 25, 2018

Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies Seminar

December to March 2018-2019

4th December – Anne Thell (NU Singapore), Resisting the Sovereignty of Sight in Samuel Johnson’s Journey (1775) [Chair: Markman Ellis]

29 January: Chloe Wigston Smith (York): Women’s Work and the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World [Chair: Markman Ellis]

12 February: Robin Mills (History, QM): Happiness and the Threat of Scepticism in the Scottish Enlightenment: John Gregory’s Therapeutic Application of the Science of Human Nature. Organised with the Queen Mary Centre for Religion and Literaturein English.

26 March: Dr Naomi Billingsley from the University of Manchester/John Rylands Research Institute: Extra-Illustrating the Macklin Bible [Chair: Jessica Patterson]

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: Karen Harvey (Birmingham) 6 November 2018

October 30, 2018

Tuesday 6 November 2018

Karen Harvey

(University of Birmingham)

What is a Material History of the Body?

That the body is a social and cultural construction is a leitmotif of historical scholarship. The body is also a physical entity that constitutes experience. This paper explores what happens when we apply ‘the material turn’ to the human body. With a focus on eighteenth-century Britain, it considers first what historians might learn when they integrate physical evidence of the material body into their research, as well as some of the challenges of undertaking this kind of work. Using written documents, the paper then examines the potential for studying the experience of the body – embodiment – in the past. Both approaches can help us understand better the ways that age, gender and rank affected the experiences of eighteenth-century men and women.

Chair: Amanda Vickery

 

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: Innes Keighren (RHUL), 23 October 2018

October 14, 2018

23rd October 2018

Innes Keighren (RHUL)

The forgotten lives of William Macintosh in the Age of Revolution: from Caribbean planter to traveller in India; from spy in France to exile in Germany

Chair: Miles Ogborn

Through an attention to the life and work of William Macintosh—a Scots Caribbean plantation owner turned global travel writer and political commentator—this paper considers the significance of both individual mobility and the circulation of ideas to Britain’s imperial project in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. I begin by documenting the emergence of Macintosh as a political actor and pamphleteer and his efforts to shape Britain’s imperial policy from the Caribbean periphery. I then examine the significance of Macintosh’s personal mobility between the West Indies and the East Indies as he completed a tour-of-the-empire journey narrated in his 1782 book Travels in Europe, Asia, and Africa. The circulation of the ideas contained in Travels—most particularly Macintosh’s vision for a more just Indian empire and call for the removal of East India Company control there—will be examined for what it reveals about the uneven mobility of knowledge in print. Taken as a whole, the paper will offer a new perspective on the circulation of radical ideas in the Age of Revolution and will demonstrate the crucial role Travels played in the impeachment and trial of Warren Hastings and in British governmental efforts to restrict the authority of the East India Company. I conclude by reflecting on the process of forgetting and why there is value in writing Macintosh back into the historical record of the eighteenth century.

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: Rebecca Spang (Indiana): 9 October 2018

October 5, 2018

All welcome

Tuesday 9 October 2018

Rebecca Spang (Indiana University Bloomington)

Brothers without Fraternity: Male Sibling Relations and the French Revolution

The first national political body of the French Revolution (the Constituent Assembly) included at least forty-two men who also had brothers in the Assembly; many others were serving alongside their cousins, uncles, or fathers-in-law. Male familial ties (mediated, of course, by women) were therefore central to the era that saw the rise of “fraternity” as a political ideal. While most histories treat fraternity as an equalizing rhetoric, one that aims to replace the autocratic structure of patriarchal rule with horizontal ties based on brotherly fellow feeling, this paper instead looks to the work of feminist and psychoanalyst Juliet Mitchell to tell this story in terms of ambivalent emotions and the fear of sameness.

Chair: Barbara Taylor

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right]

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

 

Queen Mary Eighteenth-Century Studies Seminar: Semester One 2018-19

September 18, 2018

All welcome: the seminar is open to anyone interested in eighteenth century studies.

Programme Semester One 2018-19

9 October 2018: Rebecca Spang (Indiana University Bloomington) ‘Brothers without Fraternity: Male Siblings and the French Revolution’, [Chair: Barbara Taylor]

23 October 2018: Innes Keighren (RHUL):  ‘The forgotten lives of William Macintosh in the Age of Revolution: from Caribbean planter to traveller in India; from spy in France to exile in Germany’ [Chair: Miles Ogborn]

6 November 2018: Karen Harvey (University of Birmingham), ‘What is a Material History of the Body?’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

20 November 2018: Mikael Alm (University of Uppsala/Matariki Fellow at Durham University), ‘Fashioning Difference: Sartorial Practices and Social Order in Late Eighteenth-Century Sweden’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

4 December 2018: Anne Thell (National University of Singapore), ‘Resisting the Sovereignty of Sight in Samuel Johnson’s Journey (1775)’ [Chair: Markman Ellis]

 

Location: Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

If you would like to be added to the email distribution list, please email Markman Ellis (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk)

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].