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QMCECS Seminar: Naomi Billingsley, 26 March

March 20, 2019

26 March 2019

Naomi Billingsley

(University of Manchester/John Rylands Research Institute),

Extra-Illustrating the Macklin Bible

Chair: Jessica Patterson
This paper explores how collectors, and one in particular, extra-illustrated the Macklin Bible – a large, illustrated Bible, published by London printseller Thomas Macklin between 1789 and 1800. My primary focus will be on the Bowyer Bible – the forty-five-volume copy of the Macklin Bible that was extra-illustrated by fellow printseller Robert Bowyer between c.1801 and 1826, and now in the collection of Bolton Central Library. I will put the Bowyer Bible in context with a brief survey of other extra-illustrated Macklin Bibles, and situate this narrative of extra-illustrating the Macklin Bible in relation to the craze for extra-illustration in late eighteenth century Britain.
All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, cross Burdett Road, go under the Mile End Green Bridge (a large yellow bridge), over the canal, and the college is on the right. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is on Westfield Way, the third building on the right from Mile End Rd].

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QMCECS Seminar: Dror Wahrman, 12 March

March 5, 2019

12 March 2019

Dror Wahrman

(Vigevani Chair in European Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem and QMUL ERASMUS Visiting Professor)

The prince, the jeweller and the mogul: on the paradoxes of an early modern object

Chair: Colin Jones

“The Throne of the Great Mogul” is one of the most extraordinary works of art in early modern Europe, an elaborate multi-piece miniature model, made of gold, silver, enamel and thousands of precious gemstones, representing the court of the Indian mogul Aurangzeb, that was purchased around 1700 for an enormous sum by the Saxon prince August the Strong. The talk derives from a book-length project that tries to make sense of this seemingly inexplicable object and to place it within broader early modern questions and trends. It will discuss the fantasies of the Saxon prince that might explain this unusual investment in a complex representation of the court of a foreign contemporary ruler, the desires and intentions of a highly erudite jeweller that concocted the whole project as a purposefully unique and irreproducible work of art, and in the lessons that can be drawn from this object about the history of Europe in a world context at the moment circa 1700 when the age of absolutism met the first age of globalism.

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All welcome

Time: 6.00-8.00pm. Please note later start time.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Please forward this invitation to any interested people. The seminar is open to all.

QMCECS Seminar: Chloe Wigston-Smith (University of York), 29 Jan 2019

January 29, 2019

Tuesday 29 January 2019

Chloe Wigston-Smith (University of York)

Women’s Work and the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World

This paper attends to the links between women’s handmade artefacts and the politics of empire. It examines not only the globally sourced materials that women and girls used to create domestic crafts, but also looks at the visual influence of empire on material objects. I pair objects such as embroidered maps, dressed prints, and samplers with the textual representation of domestic artefacts and cross-cultural dress in Charlotte Lennox’s 1790 transatlantic novel, Euphemia. In Lennox’s novel, domestic objects and textiles become unmoored in colonial contact zones, as they circulate in various settings, and are reused and recombined with other material forms. Together objects, both actual and literary, offer new insights into the relations between gender and the Atlantic world, and the movement of non-commercial, portable things.

Chair: Markman Ellis

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

QMCECS/BSECS Short-Term Early-Career Visiting Fellowship 2018-19

December 19, 2018

The Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, in conjunction wit the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, is pleased to accept applications for its annual Visiting Fellowship for early career researchers.

The award consists of two parts: from BSECS £400 towards travel and living expenses, and from QMCECS seven nights accommodation in Queen Mary fellows’ housing on campus at Mile End (equivalent to £400). It will normally involve the Fellow in research in libraries and archives in London, and also in making contacts with QM researchers. Your application should make clear the nature of the research you will undertake in London on the award, and its relation to your wider research project or dissertation.

The Fellowship is open to scholars of the ‘long’ eighteenth century (or any part of it) in any discipline. This award is open to early career researchers: any doctoral student at a British university in their second year of study and above, and any post-doctoral researcher normally resident in Britain, within five years of the award of their PhD.

Deadline for applications: 17 January in any year. The award must be taken up in the period February 1 to June 31 (subject to availability of accommodation).

The application form can be downloaded here as a word document.

QMCECS Seminar: Anne Thell (NUS): Tuesday 4 December 2018

December 3, 2018

Tuesday 4 December 2018

Anne Thell (National University of Singapore)

Resisting the Sovereignty of Sight in Samuel Johnson’s Journey to the Western Islands (1775)

Across his career, Samuel Johnson had a great deal to say about travel and travel writing, as he believed that these activities might enable the production of universal knowledge and a more comprehensive moral philosophy. However, in his own travelogue, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland (1775), Johnson emphasizes not a smooth process of knowledge accrual but rather the problems and uncertainties of observation, perception, and induction. Indeed, Johnson’s Journey is formally provocative in ways not yet adequately explored in that it focuses on visual deprivation in order to explore the role of the senses in relation to the mind and, more broadly, to undermine empiricist assumptions about the primacy of sight. All of this helps to concretize the Journey’s unexpected moral lesson: ‘Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses … advances us in the dignity of thinking beings’.

Chair: Markman Ellis

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: Plan 2018-19

November 25, 2018

Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies Seminar

December to March 2018-2019

4th December – Anne Thell (NU Singapore), Resisting the Sovereignty of Sight in Samuel Johnson’s Journey (1775) [Chair: Markman Ellis]

29 January: Chloe Wigston Smith (York): Women’s Work and the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World [Chair: Markman Ellis]

12 February: Robin Mills (History, QM): Happiness and the Threat of Scepticism in the Scottish Enlightenment: John Gregory’s Therapeutic Application of the Science of Human Nature. Organised with the Queen Mary Centre for Religion and Literaturein English.

26 March: Dr Naomi Billingsley from the University of Manchester/John Rylands Research Institute: Extra-Illustrating the Macklin Bible [Chair: Jessica Patterson]

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: Karen Harvey (Birmingham) 6 November 2018

October 30, 2018

Tuesday 6 November 2018

Karen Harvey

(University of Birmingham)

What is a Material History of the Body?

That the body is a social and cultural construction is a leitmotif of historical scholarship. The body is also a physical entity that constitutes experience. This paper explores what happens when we apply ‘the material turn’ to the human body. With a focus on eighteenth-century Britain, it considers first what historians might learn when they integrate physical evidence of the material body into their research, as well as some of the challenges of undertaking this kind of work. Using written documents, the paper then examines the potential for studying the experience of the body – embodiment – in the past. Both approaches can help us understand better the ways that age, gender and rank affected the experiences of eighteenth-century men and women.

Chair: Amanda Vickery

 

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).