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Queen Mary Eighteenth-Century Studies Seminar: Semester One 2018-19

September 18, 2018

All welcome: the seminar is open to anyone interested in eighteenth century studies.

Programme Semester One 2018-19

9 October 2018: Rebecca Spang (Indiana University Bloomington) ‘Brothers without Fraternity: Male Siblings and the French Revolution’, [Chair: Barbara Taylor]

23 October 2018: Innes Keighren (RHUL):  ‘The forgotten lives of William Macintosh in the Age of Revolution: from Caribbean planter to traveller in India; from spy in France to exile in Germany’ [Chair: Miles Ogborn]

6 November 2018: Karen Harvey (University of Birmingham), ‘What is a Material History of the Body?’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

20 November 2018: Mikael Alm (University of Uppsala/Matariki Fellow at Durham University), ‘Fashioning Difference: Sartorial Practices and Social Order in Late Eighteenth-Century Sweden’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

4 December 2018: Anne Thell (National University of Singapore), ‘Resisting the Sovereignty of Sight in Samuel Johnson’s Journey (1775)’ [Chair: Markman Ellis]

 

Location: Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

If you would like to be added to the email distribution list, please email Markman Ellis (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk)

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

 

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QMCECS Seminar: Suvir Kaul, 8 June 2018

May 11, 2018

Friday 8 June 2018

Professor Suvir Kaul (University of Pennsylvania)

Apostrophe as a Theory of History

Personification has attracted continuing critical attention as a figure for the power of poetry to animate the inanimate and to give voice to the voiceless. In turn, apostrophe has been read as exemplary of lyrical voice, and of those forms of poetic address that model self-referential circuits of poetic utterance. In this understanding, the poetics of apostrophe refuses critical attempts to read into its deployment historical and political reference. This talk will argue that any critic who pays attention to eighteenth-century uses of apostrophe will recognize that it is one of many figures that allow poets to engage fully with the worlds their poems bring into being. Rhetoricians and grammarians like Alexander Adam, James Grant, and Hugh Blair understood it in those terms, and I will turn briefly to their writing. I will also argue that apostrophe, like any other rhetorical figure, is a vivid element of the poetics of empire as it was developed over the course of this century. Here, my examples will come from Joseph Addison’s A Letter from Italy, to the Right Honourable Charles Lord Halifax (1704), Edward Young’s Imperium Pelagi (1729) and Hannah More’s abolitionist “Slavery, A Poem” (1788). In sum, the talk will suggest that any critical poetics is necessarily a historical poetics.

Chair: Markman Ellis

All welcome

Time: 3.00-5.00pm. Please note change of time.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Alice Dolan (alice.dolan@qmul.ac.uk).

 

 

QMCECS Seminar: Kathleen Murphy (Cal Poly) 24 April 2018

April 16, 2018

QMCECS Seminar: Summer term 2018

Tuesday 24 April 2018

Kathleen Murphy (Cal Poly)

Searching for Goliath: Dru Drury, Insect Collecting and the Eighteenth-Century British Slave Trade.

Professor Murphy’s book project, Collecting Slave Traders: Natural History and the Eighteenth-Century British Slave Trade, examines the intersection of the history of science and the history of the British slave trade. It explores how the circulation of objects, ideas, and individuals through the networks of the slave trade engendered new scientific knowledge between 1660 and 1807. She argues that the particularities of the British slave trade shaped the knowledge produced through its networks and that scientific knowledge, in turn, influenced the development of the slave trade.

Chair: Miles Ogborn

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm. Please note change of location.

Venue: Seminar Room 2.07, ArtsOne Building, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

The seminar room is on the second floor of the ArtsOne Building, located on Mile End Road: the first large QM building you find after coming from Mile End Tube. The main doors to Mile End Rd will be open until 6pm. There are stairs to the second floor immediately on your left as you enter, and the lift is further into the building on the right.

 

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Alice Dolan (alice.dolan@qmul.ac.uk).

 

 

QMCECS Summer Term 2018 events

March 28, 2018

QMCECS Seminar: Summer term events 2018 

 

Seminar: Tuesday 24 April 2018

Kathleen Murphy (History Department – Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo)

Searching for Goliath: Dru Drury, Insect Collecting and the Eighteenth-Century British Slave Trade.

Chair: Miles Ogborn

5-7pm: Lockkeeper’s Graduate Centre

 

Seminar: Monday 4 June 2018

Suvir Kaul (Department of English – University of Pennsylvania)

Apostrophe as a Theory of History

Chair: Markman Ellis

5-7pm: Lockkeeper’s Graduate Centre

 

Two-day symposium: 17–18 May 2018

Representations of ‘Europeanness’ in the long eighteenth century

Date: 17–18 May 2018

Location: Queen Mary University of London, Mile End

Keynote speaker: Professor Kathleen Wilson (Stony Brook University)

More information: https://18thceuropeanness.wordpress.com/

CANCELLED: QMCECS Seminar: Innes Keighren, 6th March 2018

February 23, 2018

Please note that Innes’s seminar has been CANCELLED to support UCU strike action on pensions. We will be rescheduling this seminar later in the year.

 

Our next seminar will be :

24th April 2018

Kathleen Murphy (Cal Poly) Searching for Goliath: Dru Drury, Insect Collecting and the Eighteenth-Century British Slave Trade.

Chair: Miles Ogborn

QMCECS Seminar: Hilary Davidson (Sydney): 20 Feb 2018

February 15, 2018

Tuesday 20 February 2018

Hilary Davidson

(University of Sydney)

Dress and dressmaking: Regency ribbons and replicas

Chair: Alice Dolan

Hilary Davidson is a dress and textile historian specialising in early modern and medieval clothing cultures. She teaches dress history in Sydney, and was formerly curator of fashion and decorative arts at the Museum of London. Her book, on dress in the Regency period, will be published by Yale University Press in 2018. The book will be the first major scholarly volume focussed on Regency dress, and incorporates extensive evidence from material culture as well as archival sources.

 

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Alice Dolan (alice.dolan@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Representations of ‘Europeanness’ in the long eighteenth century

February 9, 2018

Representations of ‘Europeanness’ in the long eighteenth century

Date: 17–18 May 2018

Location: Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London E1 4NS

Key note speaker: Professor Kathleen Wilson (Stony Brook University)

Recent enquiries into European history have emphasised the extent to which Europe was made through its encounters with Otherness. From this perspective, the long eighteenth century, which witnessed a radical expansion of the European imperial project, offers a perfect vantage point for the observation of historical change in conceptualisations of European identity as a national, racial, political, cultural, and geographical construct. European colonies overseas constituted an ‘imaginary and physical space’ in which the inclusions and exclusions built into the notions of European identity were worked out. Therefore, the meanings of ‘Europeanness’ in its various contexts cannot be adequately assessed without an examination of the complex relationship between metropole and colony and its contribution to developing notions of difference.
This two-day symposium examines the construction of Europeanness as a national, cultural, and racial category within a colonial context. Papers are invited to consider both specific national identities (e.g. Britishness, Frenchness) and the construct of Europe as a shared identity through the creation of scientific ‘knowledge’, political and economic privilege, as well as cultural and material practices. Representations of Europeanness took place on various platforms from political rhetoric to individual bodies, and encyclopedias to house interiors. Such variables as, for example, legal status, national origin, gender, skin colour, religion, family connection, reputation, and geography all contributed to the fashioning of European identity through defining human difference.
The interdisciplinary symposium will bring together established scholars, early career researchers, and postgraduate researchers examining the topic from a variety of cultural and intellectual history, literature, and historical geography perspectives. The symposium is organized in collaboration with the Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies (QMCECS). The key note lecture will be given by Professor Kathleen Wilson (Stony Brook University), whose books include The Sense of the People: Politics, Culture and Imperialism in England, 1715–1785 (1995) and The Island Race: Englishness Empire and Gender in the Eighteenth Century (2003).

Free registration to the symposium: https://18thceuropeanness.eventbrite.co.uk

Conference organizer: Dr Soile Ylivuori, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellow
School of History, Queen Mary University of London
s.ylivuori@qmul.ac.uk