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QMCECS Seminar: Karen Harvey (Birmingham) 6 November 2018

October 30, 2018

Tuesday 6 November 2018

Karen Harvey

(University of Birmingham)

What is a Material History of the Body?

That the body is a social and cultural construction is a leitmotif of historical scholarship. The body is also a physical entity that constitutes experience. This paper explores what happens when we apply ‘the material turn’ to the human body. With a focus on eighteenth-century Britain, it considers first what historians might learn when they integrate physical evidence of the material body into their research, as well as some of the challenges of undertaking this kind of work. Using written documents, the paper then examines the potential for studying the experience of the body – embodiment – in the past. Both approaches can help us understand better the ways that age, gender and rank affected the experiences of eighteenth-century men and women.

Chair: Amanda Vickery

 

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

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QMCECS Seminar: Innes Keighren (RHUL), 23 October 2018

October 14, 2018

23rd October 2018

Innes Keighren (RHUL)

The forgotten lives of William Macintosh in the Age of Revolution: from Caribbean planter to traveller in India; from spy in France to exile in Germany

Chair: Miles Ogborn

Through an attention to the life and work of William Macintosh—a Scots Caribbean plantation owner turned global travel writer and political commentator—this paper considers the significance of both individual mobility and the circulation of ideas to Britain’s imperial project in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. I begin by documenting the emergence of Macintosh as a political actor and pamphleteer and his efforts to shape Britain’s imperial policy from the Caribbean periphery. I then examine the significance of Macintosh’s personal mobility between the West Indies and the East Indies as he completed a tour-of-the-empire journey narrated in his 1782 book Travels in Europe, Asia, and Africa. The circulation of the ideas contained in Travels—most particularly Macintosh’s vision for a more just Indian empire and call for the removal of East India Company control there—will be examined for what it reveals about the uneven mobility of knowledge in print. Taken as a whole, the paper will offer a new perspective on the circulation of radical ideas in the Age of Revolution and will demonstrate the crucial role Travels played in the impeachment and trial of Warren Hastings and in British governmental efforts to restrict the authority of the East India Company. I conclude by reflecting on the process of forgetting and why there is value in writing Macintosh back into the historical record of the eighteenth century.

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: Rebecca Spang (Indiana): 9 October 2018

October 5, 2018

All welcome

Tuesday 9 October 2018

Rebecca Spang (Indiana University Bloomington)

Brothers without Fraternity: Male Sibling Relations and the French Revolution

The first national political body of the French Revolution (the Constituent Assembly) included at least forty-two men who also had brothers in the Assembly; many others were serving alongside their cousins, uncles, or fathers-in-law. Male familial ties (mediated, of course, by women) were therefore central to the era that saw the rise of “fraternity” as a political ideal. While most histories treat fraternity as an equalizing rhetoric, one that aims to replace the autocratic structure of patriarchal rule with horizontal ties based on brotherly fellow feeling, this paper instead looks to the work of feminist and psychoanalyst Juliet Mitchell to tell this story in terms of ambivalent emotions and the fear of sameness.

Chair: Barbara Taylor

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right]

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

 

Queen Mary Eighteenth-Century Studies Seminar: Semester One 2018-19

September 18, 2018

All welcome: the seminar is open to anyone interested in eighteenth century studies.

Programme Semester One 2018-19

9 October 2018: Rebecca Spang (Indiana University Bloomington) ‘Brothers without Fraternity: Male Siblings and the French Revolution’, [Chair: Barbara Taylor]

23 October 2018: Innes Keighren (RHUL):  ‘The forgotten lives of William Macintosh in the Age of Revolution: from Caribbean planter to traveller in India; from spy in France to exile in Germany’ [Chair: Miles Ogborn]

6 November 2018: Karen Harvey (University of Birmingham), ‘What is a Material History of the Body?’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

20 November 2018: Mikael Alm (University of Uppsala/Matariki Fellow at Durham University), ‘Fashioning Difference: Sartorial Practices and Social Order in Late Eighteenth-Century Sweden’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

4 December 2018: Anne Thell (National University of Singapore), ‘Resisting the Sovereignty of Sight in Samuel Johnson’s Journey (1775)’ [Chair: Markman Ellis]

 

Location: Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

If you would like to be added to the email distribution list, please email Markman Ellis (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk)

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

 

QMCECS Seminar: Suvir Kaul, 8 June 2018

May 11, 2018

Friday 8 June 2018

Professor Suvir Kaul (University of Pennsylvania)

Apostrophe as a Theory of History

Personification has attracted continuing critical attention as a figure for the power of poetry to animate the inanimate and to give voice to the voiceless. In turn, apostrophe has been read as exemplary of lyrical voice, and of those forms of poetic address that model self-referential circuits of poetic utterance. In this understanding, the poetics of apostrophe refuses critical attempts to read into its deployment historical and political reference. This talk will argue that any critic who pays attention to eighteenth-century uses of apostrophe will recognize that it is one of many figures that allow poets to engage fully with the worlds their poems bring into being. Rhetoricians and grammarians like Alexander Adam, James Grant, and Hugh Blair understood it in those terms, and I will turn briefly to their writing. I will also argue that apostrophe, like any other rhetorical figure, is a vivid element of the poetics of empire as it was developed over the course of this century. Here, my examples will come from Joseph Addison’s A Letter from Italy, to the Right Honourable Charles Lord Halifax (1704), Edward Young’s Imperium Pelagi (1729) and Hannah More’s abolitionist “Slavery, A Poem” (1788). In sum, the talk will suggest that any critical poetics is necessarily a historical poetics.

Chair: Markman Ellis

All welcome

Time: 3.00-5.00pm. Please note change of time.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Alice Dolan (alice.dolan@qmul.ac.uk).

 

 

QMCECS Seminar: Kathleen Murphy (Cal Poly) 24 April 2018

April 16, 2018

QMCECS Seminar: Summer term 2018

Tuesday 24 April 2018

Kathleen Murphy (Cal Poly)

Searching for Goliath: Dru Drury, Insect Collecting and the Eighteenth-Century British Slave Trade.

Professor Murphy’s book project, Collecting Slave Traders: Natural History and the Eighteenth-Century British Slave Trade, examines the intersection of the history of science and the history of the British slave trade. It explores how the circulation of objects, ideas, and individuals through the networks of the slave trade engendered new scientific knowledge between 1660 and 1807. She argues that the particularities of the British slave trade shaped the knowledge produced through its networks and that scientific knowledge, in turn, influenced the development of the slave trade.

Chair: Miles Ogborn

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm. Please note change of location.

Venue: Seminar Room 2.07, ArtsOne Building, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

The seminar room is on the second floor of the ArtsOne Building, located on Mile End Road: the first large QM building you find after coming from Mile End Tube. The main doors to Mile End Rd will be open until 6pm. There are stairs to the second floor immediately on your left as you enter, and the lift is further into the building on the right.

 

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Alice Dolan (alice.dolan@qmul.ac.uk).

 

 

QMCECS Summer Term 2018 events

March 28, 2018

QMCECS Seminar: Summer term events 2018 

 

Seminar: Tuesday 24 April 2018

Kathleen Murphy (History Department – Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo)

Searching for Goliath: Dru Drury, Insect Collecting and the Eighteenth-Century British Slave Trade.

Chair: Miles Ogborn

5-7pm: Lockkeeper’s Graduate Centre

 

Seminar: Monday 4 June 2018

Suvir Kaul (Department of English – University of Pennsylvania)

Apostrophe as a Theory of History

Chair: Markman Ellis

5-7pm: Lockkeeper’s Graduate Centre

 

Two-day symposium: 17–18 May 2018

Representations of ‘Europeanness’ in the long eighteenth century

Date: 17–18 May 2018

Location: Queen Mary University of London, Mile End

Keynote speaker: Professor Kathleen Wilson (Stony Brook University)

More information: https://18thceuropeanness.wordpress.com/