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QMCECS Seminar November 2019 Postponed

November 19, 2019

Due to industrial action the seminar planned for 26 November 2019 has been postponed. A revised calendar of seminars is attached below.

Semester Two 2019-20

28 January 2020: Hannah Williams (QMUL), ‘Artists’ Things: Material Cultures of the Paris Art World’ (Chair: Colin Jones)

11 February 2010: Tess Somervell (Leeds): ‘The Doubting Plowman: Climate and Contingency in Eighteenth-Century Georgic Poetry’ (Chair: Will Bowers)

25 February 2020: Gillian Russell (York) [title tba]

10 March 2020: James Morland (QMUL Solitude Project) ‘The Sadness of Care: Solitude and Eighteenth-Century Physician Poets’ (Chair: Barbara Taylor)

24 March 2020: Stephanie O’Rourke (St Andrews), ‘Forest Histories’ (Chair: Hannah Williams)

Time: 5.00-7.00pm (please note our return to usual time-slot)

Location: ArtsTwo 2.17, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Will Bowers, English (will.bowers@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Hannah Williams, History (hannah.williams@qmul.ac.uk).

Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. Turn first Entering campus here, turn first left, pass along the back of ArtsOne, the Law building and the Novo cemetery, to find ArtsTwo, the School of History building.

QMCECS Seminar: 29 October 2019: Sophie Gee (Princeton)

October 23, 2019

29 October 2019

Sophie Gee (Princeton)

Communion, Communication and Sacrifice in Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones

(Chair: Markman Ellis)

Professor Sophie Gee is in the English Department at Princeton University, where she specializes in eighteenth-century British Literature in global and imperial perspectives. She is the author of Making Waste: Leftovers and the Eighteenth-Century Imagination (2009), about the period’s obsession with things discarded, and a critically acclaimed novel, The Scandal of the Season, a comedy of manners that retells the scandal behind Pope’s ‘The Rape of the Lock’. She is currently completing a new monograph, entitled The Eucharist and the Rise of the Novel.

Time: Semester One: 6.00-8.00pm. Note change from our usual time.

Location: ArtsTwo 2.17, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Will Bowers, English (will.bowers@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Hannah Williams, History (hannah.williams@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. Entering campus here, turn first left, pass along the back of ArtsOne, the Law building and the Novo cemetery, to find ArtsTwo, the School of History building].

 

QMCECS Seminar 15 October 2019: Robbie Richardson

October 8, 2019

Colliers_de_porcelaine_(La_Potherie)

Tuesday 15 October 2019

Robbie Richardson

(University of Kent)

Unwitnessing Meaning: British Understandings of Wampum in the Eighteenth Century

For British writers in the eighteenth century, wampum, or shell beads strung or woven together and highly valued in Native American societies, was a perplexing material. As both text and commodity, sacred pact and ornament, wampum conflated European systems of meaning. This paper will look at various interpretations of wampum in periodicals, histories, treatises on writing, and novels, as well as in museum guides and visual culture, and will assess the epistemological challenges it placed on a society in which the lines between finance and culture were becoming increasingly blurred. It will additionally look to more recent work by book historians and Indigenous scholars to understand how historical objects from First Nations societies can be “read” today.

Chair: Miles Ogborn

All welcome

Time: 6.00-8.00pm.

Venue: Location: ArtsTwo 2.17, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Will Bowers, English (will.bowers@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Hannah Williams, History (hannah.williams@qmul.ac.uk).

QMCECS Seminar: Penelope Corfield, 1st October 2019

September 24, 2019

1 October 2019

Penelope Corfield (RHUL and Newcastle)

Change within Change: The Decline of the Deep Bow/Curtsey and the Rise of the Egalitarian Handshake in Eighteenth-Century Britain

This presentation develops Penelope Corfield’s earlier research into the history of inter-personal greetings. Etiquette books offered rules for formal behaviour but are not good guides to casual encounters. Instead, broad trends can be detected from evidence in letters, plays, novels and travelogues. The deep bow from men was slowly turning into nod and brief touch of hand to head; the deep curtsey from women was translating into a quick bob. Yet the long eighteenth-century in Britain saw not only change – but change within change. A new style of greeting, in the form of the egalitarian handshake, was quietly emerging. This presentation analyses the causes, timings, and meanings of these innovations.

Chair: Amanda Vickery

Time: Semester One: 6.00-8.00pm. Note change from our usual time.

Location: ArtsTwo 2.17, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Will Bowers, English (will.bowers@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Hannah Williams, History (hannah.williams@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. Turn first Entering campus here, turn first left, pass along the back of ArtsOne, the Law building and the Novo cemetery, to find ArtsTwo, the School of History building].

QMCECS Seminar Semester One 2019-20

September 16, 2019

All welcome.

Please forward this blog post to anyone who might be interested.

1 October 2019: Penelope Corfield (RHUL): ‘Change within Change: The Decline of the Deep Bow/Curtsey and the Rise of the Egalitarian Handshake in Eighteenth-Century Britain’ (Chair: Amanda Vickery)

15 October 2019: Robbie Richardson (Kent): ‘Unwitnessing Meaning: British Understandings of Wampum in the Eighteenth Century’ (Chair: Miles Ogborn)

29 October 2019: Sophie Gee (Princeton): ‘Communion, Communication and Sacrifice in Tom Jones’ (Chair: Markman Ellis)

26 November 2019: Tess Somervell (Leeds): ‘The Doubting Plowman: Climate and Contingency in Eighteenth-Century Georgic Poetry’ (Chair: Will Bowers)

Time: Semester One: 6.00-8.00pm. Note change from our usual time.

Location: ArtsTwo 2.17, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

 

Semester Two

28 January 2020: Hannah Williams (QMUL)

25 February 2020: Gillian Russell (York)

10 March 2020: James Morland (QMUL Solitude Project)

24 March 2020: Stephanie O’Rourke (St Andrews)

Titles to be confirmed. 5.00-7.00pm.

 

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Will Bowers, English (will.bowers@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Hannah Williams, History (hannah.williams@qmul.ac.uk).

Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. Turn first Entering campus here, turn first left, pass along the back of ArtsOne, the Law building and the Novo cemetery, to find ArtsTwo, the School of History building.

QMCECS Seminar: Naomi Billingsley, 26 March

March 20, 2019

26 March 2019

Naomi Billingsley

(University of Manchester/John Rylands Research Institute),

Extra-Illustrating the Macklin Bible

Chair: Jessica Patterson
This paper explores how collectors, and one in particular, extra-illustrated the Macklin Bible – a large, illustrated Bible, published by London printseller Thomas Macklin between 1789 and 1800. My primary focus will be on the Bowyer Bible – the forty-five-volume copy of the Macklin Bible that was extra-illustrated by fellow printseller Robert Bowyer between c.1801 and 1826, and now in the collection of Bolton Central Library. I will put the Bowyer Bible in context with a brief survey of other extra-illustrated Macklin Bibles, and situate this narrative of extra-illustrating the Macklin Bible in relation to the craze for extra-illustration in late eighteenth century Britain.
All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk); Dr Jessica Patterson (j.patterson@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, cross Burdett Road, go under the Mile End Green Bridge (a large yellow bridge), over the canal, and the college is on the right. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is on Westfield Way, the third building on the right from Mile End Rd].

QMCECS Seminar: Dror Wahrman, 12 March

March 5, 2019

12 March 2019

Dror Wahrman

(Vigevani Chair in European Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem and QMUL ERASMUS Visiting Professor)

The prince, the jeweller and the mogul: on the paradoxes of an early modern object

Chair: Colin Jones

“The Throne of the Great Mogul” is one of the most extraordinary works of art in early modern Europe, an elaborate multi-piece miniature model, made of gold, silver, enamel and thousands of precious gemstones, representing the court of the Indian mogul Aurangzeb, that was purchased around 1700 for an enormous sum by the Saxon prince August the Strong. The talk derives from a book-length project that tries to make sense of this seemingly inexplicable object and to place it within broader early modern questions and trends. It will discuss the fantasies of the Saxon prince that might explain this unusual investment in a complex representation of the court of a foreign contemporary ruler, the desires and intentions of a highly erudite jeweller that concocted the whole project as a purposefully unique and irreproducible work of art, and in the lessons that can be drawn from this object about the history of Europe in a world context at the moment circa 1700 when the age of absolutism met the first age of globalism.

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All welcome

Time: 6.00-8.00pm. Please note later start time.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Please forward this invitation to any interested people. The seminar is open to all.