Skip to content

QMCECS Seminar: Stephen Bending: 17 January 2017

January 12, 2017

Tuesday 17 January 2017

Stephen Bending

(University of Southampton)

Pleasure Gardens and the Problems of Pleasure c.1650-1830

What use is pleasure? On both sides of the Enlightenment Atlantic the problem of pleasure—too much, not enough, the wrong kind, the wrong place—confronted the individual both with the immediacy of the senses and with their sense of their self in the world. Ranging from the sophisticated model of garden analysis and self-reflection offered by Madame de Scudery, to the equally complex experience of pleasure grounds articulated by (and about) the Jefferson family at Monticello in early nineteenth-century Virginia, this paper aims to set the sensual and intellectual pleasures of the garden in the context of the Enlightenment’s struggle to account for the immediacy of sensation and the unruliness of emotion; focusing on the disruptive nature of pleasure, the paper will explore the conflicts and elisions of public statement and private experience in the pleasure gardens of eighteenth-century Britain, France and North America.

Chair: Barbara Taylor

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

QMCECS/BSECS Early-Career Visiting Fellowship 2016-17

December 16, 2016

The Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, in conjunction wit the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, is pleased to accept applications for its annual Visiting Fellowship for early career researchers.

 The award consists of two parts: from BSECS £400 towards travel and living expenses, and from QMCECS seven nights accommodation in Queen Mary fellows’ housing on campus at Mile End (equivalent to £350). It will normally involve the Fellow in research in libraries and archives in London, and also in making contacts with QM researchers. Your application should make clear the nature of the research you will undertake in London on the award, and its relation to your wider research project or dissertation.

The Fellowship is open to scholars of the ‘long’ eighteenth century (or any part of it) in any discipline. This award is open to early career researchers: any doctoral student at a British university in their second year of study and above, and any post-doctoral researcher normally resident in Britain, within five years of the award of their PhD.

The application form can be downloaded from a link on this page:  http://www.qmul.ac.uk/eighteenthcentury/.

Please send completed applications, with a 2 page CV including a summary statement of your dissertation or research project, by email to Professor Markman Ellis, Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS: m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk.  The applications will be assessed by the centre’s governing committee.

Deadline for applications: 17 January 2016. The award must be taken up in the period February 1 to June 31 (subject to availability of accommodation).

Queen Mary Eighteenth-Century Studies Seminar: Semester Two 2016-17

December 16, 2016
Queen Mary Eighteenth-Century Studies Seminar 
Semester Two 2016-17

Tuesday 17 January 2017:
Stephen Bending (University of Southampton): ‘Pleasure Gardens and the Problems of Pleasure c.1650-1830’ [Chair: Barbara Taylor]

Tuesday 31 January 2017:
Rosalind Carr (University of East London), ‘A Landscape of Feeling? Politeness, Violence and Masculinity in early New South Wales, c.1788-1815’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

Tuesday 28 February 2017:
Norma Clarke  (Kingston University): ‘Oliver Goldsmith and his Biographers’ [Chair: Markman Ellis]

Tuesday 14 March 2017:
Pascal Bastien (University of Quebec in Montreal): ‘Five seconds of history: temporal perspectives on a public execution in eighteenth-century Paris’ [Chair: Colin Jones]

Tuesday May 22:
Anne Vila (University of Wisconsin-Madison): title to be announced, [Chair: Barbara Taylor]

All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Please forward this invitation to any interested people. The seminar is open to all.

QMCECS Lunchtime Seminar Dec 1 2016: Eric Parisot

November 17, 2016

In addition to our regular evening seminar, QMCECS invites you to a supernumerary lunchtime seminar

QMCECS Lunchtime Seminar
in association with the Centre for the History of the Emotions

Thursday 1 December, 1-2pm:

Eric Parisot (Flinders University, Australia),

‘Laughing at John Damer: The Reformative Ethics of George Colman’s The Suicide, A Comedy (1778)’

When the Hon. John Damer—the profligate son of Lord Milton and husband to prominent socialite and sculptor Anne Damer— took his life in 1776, it sparked a number of responses in the correspondence of the bon ton, satirical poetry, fiction and drama. Horace Walpole gave a rather nonchalant description of events, replete with playful classical monikers, concluding with one of his favourite aphorisms: “this world is a comedy to those that think, a tragedy to those that feel”. In contrast, George Colman decided to test the ethics of laughing at suicide in his sentimental comedy, The Suicide (1778). Labelled “a very dangerous subject” by David Garrick, this domestic comedy raises matters of class, social obligation, and their relation to genuine nobility in tracing the self-destructive foibles of young Tobine. The paper reflects on why people might have found it appropriate to laugh about suicide in the late eighteenth century, what ethical concerns were raised by laughing at other people’s self-destruction, and indeed, why we no longer deem the topic of suicide as appropriate laughing matter.

Venue: ArtsTwo in room 2.17

All welcome: lunch will be provided

Please note, the seminar on Wednesday 23 November has been cancelled
Wednesday 23 November 2016, 5-7pm:
Elin Jones (QMUL): ‘Frying Clocks and Buying Geegaws: Irrational Consumption and the Naval Seaman in the Eighteenth Century’ [Chair: Miles Ogborn]
Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

 

QMCECS Seminar: Katrina O’Loughlin: 26 October 2016

October 20, 2016

All welcome

26 October 2016

Katrina O’Loughlin
(University of Western Australia)

“The feeling of friendship”: Ekaterina Dashkova’s emotional and literary bonds

The Princess Ekaterina Romanovna Dashkova (1744-1810) is recognized as one of the leading figures of the Russian Enlightenment and eighteenth-century republic of letters. Between 1769 and 1783 Dashkova travelled widely in Western Europe and forged close connections with a range of literary and philosophical leading lights including William Robertson, Adam Smith, Hugh Blair, Adam Fergusson, Denis Diderot, Voltaire, and Benjamin Franklin. Appointed Director of the Russian Imperial Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg in 1783, Dashkova became the first woman to lead a national science academy. This paper explores the bond between Catherine the Great and ‘her unoffending friend, Catherine the Little’ (as Dashkova described herself), as an early model of the significance of female friendship. The same idealism, affection, and exchange of words went on to mark Dashkova’s international friendships, particularly her deep attachments to Anglo-Irish women Catherine Hamilton, and Martha and Katherine Wilmot. Through their exchange and preservation of letters and journals, and the collective composition of Dashkova’s Memoir, we begin to understand emotional bonds as literary and material practices, and to appreciate the eighteenth-century European ‘republic of letters’ as a network of affective attachments.

Chair: Markman Ellis
Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

QMCECS Seminar: Miles Ogborn: 12 October 2016

October 5, 2016

All welcome

Queen Mary Eighteenth-Century Studies Seminar

12 October 2016

Prof Miles Ogborn (QMUL)

The Deliberative Voice: Speech, Politics and Slavery in the Anglo-Caribbean World

This paper examines the ways in which speech was central to forms of political practice and political action for all those living within the slave societies of Barbados and Jamaica from the late seventeenth century to the early nineteenth century. Treating forms of speech as situated, embodied and performed cultural practices which constitute political subjects, it attends to the modes of political speech that people on these islands voiced, heard and thought they heard in a range of sites and situations: declarations, proclamations, oaths of allegiance and debates over political action; but also rumours, gossip, libels, insults and overt challenges to authority.

Chair: Amanda Vickery
All welcome

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].

QMCECS Seminar Programme for Semester I 2016-17

September 21, 2016

Everyone is welcome to attend.

 

Queen Mary Eighteenth-Century Studies Seminar

Semester One 2016-17

12 October 2016: Miles Ogborn (QMUL), ‘The Deliberative Voice: Speech, Politics and Slavery in the Anglo-Caribbean World’ [Chair: Amanda Vickery]

26 October 2016: Katrina O’Loughlin (U Western Australia): ‘“The feeling of friendship”: Ekaterina Dashkova’s emotional and literary bonds’ [Chair: Markman Ellis]

23 November 2016: Elin Jones (QMUL): ‘Frying Clocks and Buying Geegaws: Irrational Consumption and the Naval Seaman in the Eighteenth Century’ [Chair: Miles Ogborn]

07 December 2016: Julie Kim (Fordham University, NY): ‘St Vincent botanical garden in the Age of Revolution’ [Chair: Miles Ogborn]

Time: 5.00-7.00pm.

Venue: Seminar Room, Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, London, E1 4NS.

Convenors: Prof Markman Ellis, English (m.ellis@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Colin Jones, History (c.d.h.jones@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Miles Ogborn, Geography (m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk); Prof Amanda Vickery, History (a.vickery@qmul.ac.uk), Prof Barbara Taylor, English and History (b.g.taylor@qmul.ac.uk).

[Travel instructions: take the Central Line or District Line to Mile End. Exit the tube station, turn left down Mile End Road, crossing the Burdett Road/Grove Road intersection, passing under the Mile End Green Bridge and over the canal, to the campus entrance at Westfield Way. The Lock-Keeper’s Cottage is the third building on the right].